As a loved one ages, caregiving requirements increase because of the person’s decreasing health and cognitive abilities. Families often step in to assist with everything from medication management to transportation, household duties, and daily activities. Often, family members need to manage the person’s finances as well, which is why it is important to determine the power of attorney as soon as possible.

What is Power of Attorney?

This legal document is designed to appoint a person to handle important life decisions when a patient is no longer able to make these decisions on their own. Eventually, an aging person can become incapacitated because of physical and mental health concerns. The family member assigned this responsibility makes important decisions and places the principal’s interests as a higher priority over their own needs.

If you are choosing someone to manage your affairs, then it’s essential to choose an individual you trust. This person will be acting on your behalf when you are no longer able to handle your affairs by yourself. Having power of attorney means that the person makes various decisions, such as:

  • Financial Decisions: Such as monetary gifts and managing a person’s estate.
  • Healthcare Decisions: Including consent for giving, stopping, or withholding medical treatments.

A principle can complete legal documentation at any point to determine who holds this power after they are incapacitated.

Don’t Delay Legal Services

The most effective thing you can do is have these conversations when you are able to communicate your wishes and preferences. Hiring a lawyer to help with power of attorney is an important step that gives you peace of mind for the future.

If you need advice about planning your estate and granting power to a loved one, then our team at Mortellaro Law is here to help. Contact us for a free consultation. Call 813-367-1500 or you are welcome to schedule an appointment using our convenient online form.

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