Elder Law | What Your Family Should Know

Elder Law | When Medicare was created in 1965, the Older Americans Act was also introduced to protect aging Americans. Elder law formed from this. It is the area of the law that protects elderly individuals and their family members or representatives who oversee their care and finances.
What Families Should Know About Elder Law And Abuse
Although many laws exist to protect aging Americans, there are still thousands of reports of abuse, fraud and other crimes against them every year. These are some common types of crimes committed against elderly individuals:
 

  • Physical or emotional abuse
  • Neglect
  • Fraud
  • Theft
  • Age discrimination

Families should watch for signs of abuse or neglect in elders who are in nursing homes.
How To Protect Elders Financially
For elders who have not yet created an estate plan, it is important to do so as soon as possible. A power of attorney form gives a designated person the ability to make decisions about finances and care for the elderly individual if he or she becomes mentally incapacitated or dies.
One or more trusts will protect everything from money to a home. A will designates an executor for the estate, and it specifies how assets and belongings should be distributed. For elderly individuals who still own businesses or have other significant investments, there are ways to protect them without serious tax consequences.
 
It is also important to think about income and the cost of future care. Long-term care is expensive, and VA or government health benefits may not cover everything. Planning ahead is a good way to ensure a comfortable future.
Getting Help For Elderly Loved Ones
When elder abuse of a loved one in a skilled-care facility is suspected or confirmed, call the Florida Abuse Hotline immediately at 1-800-962-2873. To protect an elder from becoming a victim of fraud or theft, call the elder law attorneys at Mortellaro Law at 813-367-1500.
 
 

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